Islamic Finance Offers Stability As a Financial System

As the world reels from the knock-on effects of the US subprime crisis, many are questioning the validity of the current financial regime and asking what should replace this flawed system. Leading Islamic Finance experts Iqbal, Mirakhor and Krichene make a strong case for adopting principles of Islamic Finance.

Sydney, Australia – infoZine – The validity of the current financial regime has been in question since the 2007 global financial crisis exposed its vulnerabilities that stem from high leveraging, a complex system of transactions and instruments, and a disconnect between the real and financial sector.

Published by John Wiley & Sons (Asia) Pte Ltd, The Stability of Islamic Finance: Creating a Resilient Financial Environment for a Secure Future develops an analytical case for the inherent stability of an Islamic financial system, a system that is based on equity financing and risk sharing. The authors, who have written numerous books and articles on Islamic finance between them, bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to the discussion of the Islamic finance industry and its place in broader efforts to reduce the volatility of global financial markets.

Focusing on the historical, analytics and empirical discussion of the comparative stability of the two systems, this book first considers episodes of turbulence and instability in a historical context recalling the occurrence of such events from mid-19th century to the present. It then offers various theoretical explanations along with solutions and alternative financial systems that avoid instability provided by various scholars dating back to mid-19th century to present. Discussing the architecture of an Islamic financial system, it shows that the Islamic financial system shares at its core many characteristics of a stable financial system proposed by Western scholars throughout history to avoid the inherent instability of the present dominant system.

Scholarly, insightful, yet highly-readable, this book makes a convincing case for the world to shed its reliance on debt, interest and leveraging, and revamp the global financial system to rely more heavily on equity and risk sharing, the foundation of an Islamic financial system.

Prof. Hossein Askari received all his university education, including a Ph.D. in economics, at MIT. He has taught at MIT, Tufts University, the University of Texas at Austin and is now the Iran Professor of International Business and International Affairs at the George Washington University. He served for two and a half years on the Executive Board of the IMF and was Special Advisor to the Minister of Finance of Saudi Arabia. In the mid-1980s he was the director of a multinational team that developed the first energy plan and energy planning models for Saudi Arabia. He has written extensively on economic development in the Middle East, international trade and finance, agricultural economics, oil economics, economic sanctions, and on Islamic economics and finance.

Dr. Zamir Iqbal works as Lead Investment Officer in the Treasury of the World Bank in Washington, D.C. He earned his Ph.D. in International Finance from the George Washington University, where he also serves as adjunct faculty of International Finance. He has extensive experience with capital markets, structured products, risk management, financial sector development, and financial modeling. His research interests include Islamic finance, financial engineering, structured finance and risk management. He is co-author of several books on Islamic banking and finance.

Dr. Noureddine Krichene received his Ph.D. in economics, University of California, Los Angeles, 1980; joined the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in 1986; and held the position of advisor at the Islamic Development Bank.

Dr. Abbas Mirakhor received his Ph.D. in Economics from Kansas State University in 1969. After teaching at various universities in the USA and in Iran he joined the staff of the Research Department of the IMF in 1984. He became an Executive Director of the IMF from 1990 until his retirement in 2008. He is the author of a number of articles and books on Islamic economics and finance. He is now the first holder of the INCEIF Chair in Islamic Finance.

source : infozin

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