Shariah banking growing rapidly

Many non-Muslims like knowing they are not investing in alcohol, tobacco or porn. More than 100000 South Africans make use of the shariah-compliant banking products of local banks.

Eric Enslin, head of client engagement at FNB Wealth, said the shariah customer base is not exclusively Muslim.

Enslin said shariah banking is consistent with the principles of Islamic rulings and their practical application through the development of Islamic economics. Shariah prohibits the payment or acceptance of interest charges (riba) for the lending and accepting of money, as well as trade and other activities that provide goods or services considered contrary to its principles.

Business Live.co.za
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http://www.businesslive.co.za/personalfinance/2012/06/09/shariah-banking-growing-rapidly

Demand for Local Sukuk ‘Excessive’ With More Likely Ahead, Official Says

The government has issued Rp 120 trillion ($12.8 billion) in Islamic bonds during the past four years, which the Finance Ministry attributes to an “excessive” demand for them among Muslim investors.

The ministry’s director for Shariah financing, Dahlan Siamat, said the government issued its first Islamic bond, known as sukuk, in 2008, and as of Thursday it had issued a total of Rp 120 trillion.

“The achievement has been supported by excessive demand for sukuk in the domestic market,” Dahlan said in Surabaya on Thursday.

“The potential for state sukuk in the country is developing rapidly, given that 80 percent of Indonesians are Muslims and there remains large potential for them to become investors.”

Indonesia has been selling conventional and Islamic bonds during the past year to help plug its growing budget deficit. The country’s budget shortfall is forecast to reach 2.23 percent of the gross domestic product this year, according to a revised 2012 state budget.

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http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/business/demand-for-local-sukuk-excessive-with-more-likely-ahead-official-says/522996

Can Islamic banking help boost Czech exports?

A good deal of the ongoing economic and financial turmoil on world markets has been blamed on the unscrupulous practices of the international banking and financial sector. Islamic banking, on the other hand, is seen as a fairer and more balanced alternative which has been much less affected by the crisis. Can the Czech Republic benefit from a financial system based on the Islamic law? And can Islamic banking help boost Czech exports into Muslim countries? These are some of the issues debated at an international conference on Islamic banking held in Prague.

Based on the principles of Islamic law, or shariah, Islamic banks are prohibited from charging interests, speculating as well as investing in businesses considered unethical by Islamic scholars. Instead, Islamic or participant banking offers a system of shared risks and profits, and its supports claim it is committed to promoting equity, moderation and social justice.

Islamic banking is today the fastest growing segment of the financial system, and is also considered a more honest and fairer alternative to conventional banking. Cihad Erginay is the Turkish ambassador to Prague, and head of the local group of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation which organized the event.

“There was great interest on the subject from our Czech colleagues, Czech bankers and journalists who kept asking us about it and expressed their interest because they saw that Islamic banks were not as affected by the economic crisis that we see today. That led us to think that it could be interesting to organize such a conference. And as you can see from the participation, there is great interest in the subject.”

source : Radio Prague
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http://www.radio.cz/en/section/marketplace/can-islamic-banking-help-boost-czech-exports